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Topic: Loading Aria player (& recording)

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  1. #1

    Loading Aria player (& recording)

    I just got GPO4 with the Aria player which I want to use with Finale 2011.
    I can load the Aria player outside of Finale with 16 instruments and save the Aria settings for these instruments.
    How do I get to the next 16 instruments?
    I can load all Aria banks within Finale, but the instruments are only saved for that particular music file.
    I want to set up the Aria player the same for all my music - without reloading all the instruments for each new Finale file.
    Can anyone help?

    Also - how do I record my music?
    All this was straightforward with my GPO Studio version 1.2

  2. #2

    Re: Loading Aria player (& recording)

    Hi Jeff,

    If you want to use Aria in a standalone fashion like in Studio, you'll need to get a set of virtual midi cables (Midi Yoke is the one I prefer for PC). Set the outputs in Finale to these, just like you would with the GPO Studio MIDI outs. You can load multiple standalone instances of Aria and load the .aria preset files into each. You will need to go to the preferences page for each and select different MIDI inputs.

    On a Mac you can create the MIDI ports using an Interapplication Connection (IAC) bus. You may need to create differently named aliases of the Aria player to run more than one simultaneously (not sure).

    For recording:
    If you only have a single instance running, then you can just use the standalone's built-in record functionality. If you have multiple instances, I would recommend using a third app, like Audacity, to capture the sound card's Wave-Out. The bounce will have to be done in real-time, as far as I know.

    There may also be a way to preserve the instrument setup in Finale 2011, but I'm not familiar with the program. You could possibly also use a template?

    Best,
    Reegs
    Last edited by Reegs; 06-25-2010 at 04:48 PM. Reason: added more

  3. #3
    Senior Member
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    Re: Loading Aria player (& recording)

    G’day Jeff,

    If you wish to drive sample players and other VST plug-ins via virtual midi cables, I would recommend that you get the free VSTHost from Hermann Seib. This way you can drive many instances of Aria, KP and other VST plug-ins. VSTHost will store all settings automatically for reuse. Reegs recommends MidiYoke as the vertual midi cable. This is what I use.

    Importantly, with VSTHost, you can export your music to a .wav file. This is a lot better than recording through your sound card to an audio editor. If you record via your sound card to an audio editor, the digital sound is converted to analog audio and back to digital audio in the DA/AD converters of your sound card. You lose quality by introducing distortion and noise.

    The music should always remain in a digital form. Only when monitoring or when the music CD is played by the end-user, should the digital audio ever be converted to analog audio.


    Herbert
    GPO, JABB, CMB, GWI, GOFRILLER, HALION PLAYER, ACCORDIONS by E Tarilonte
    Cubase 6, Notation Composer, VSTHost, GoldWave audio editor.

    Interests:
    Good Food, Gemütlichkeit, Wein Weib und Gesang – History, Politics, Civil Law –
    Electronics, Software Development, Physics – Plant Physiology, Creative Horticulture –
    Photography, Painting, Wood Working - Midi Orchestration, Music, Music, und Musik …

  4. #4

    Re: Loading Aria player (& recording)

    Quote Originally Posted by sonata5920 View Post

    The music should always remain in a digital form. Only when monitoring or when the music CD is played by the end-user, should the digital audio ever be converted to analog audio.
    In general, and for our purposes I agree--unless you happen to have expensive analog summing boxes and outboard compressors or a hybrid setup with an analog console like many pro studios use. But, this is a subject as sensitive as PC vs Mac. Most people seem to agree that analog tends to result in a more organic sounding mix (some people debate whether or not this means "better"), but obviosly in doing this they add a bit of noise and technically will colour the sound a bit. It also likely depends on what kind of music you are making and what your source material is (starting from single tracked instruments vs a recording of a live ensemble).
    "If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away." – Henry Thoreau


  5. #5
    Senior Member
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    Sep 2008
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    272

    Re: Loading Aria player (& recording)


    G’day Tim,

    You said:

    “ … I agree--unless you happen to have expensive analog summing boxes and outboard compressors or a hybrid setup with an analog console like many pro studios use.”

    Very true. If a studio has an investment in equipment, it makes sense to use and maintain the equipment until there is insufficient return. As time goes by, improved studio equipment will need to replace outdated equipment, for the studio to stay competitive.

    You said:

    “ … Most people seem to agree that analog tends to result in a more organic sounding mix …”

    Did you also know that “organic sounding mix” is 96% fat free, has little or no cholesterol, has practically no salt (NaCl) and best of all, is not made from animal products. There is always snake oil, an animal product, to cure a really bad mix.

    A number of sound equipment manufacturers promote false claims to swell their pockets.

    I am sure you agree with the following bare facts.

    Audio processing equipment can add noise and distortion to the audio signal. Digital processing of audio does not potentially add noise to the audio signal. Digital audio processing does not add any liniar or nonliniar destortion, exept for a very small amount of what is the equivalent of intermodulation distortion caused by quantisation (AD conversion). This type of distortion is dealt with well by dithering or the choice of sufficient bit depth, or both. Dithering converts the very small distortion to a very small amount of noise.

    Any conductor produces noise, related to its resistance, known as thermal noise. Vacuum tubes used in analog circuits of yesteryear produced a lot of extra noise. Modern semiconductors produce only a minute amount of noise above the expected thermal noise in analog equipment.

    Distortion is characterised as linear distortion or nonlinear distortion. Linear distortion is a deviation of the audio signal, caused by a deficient frequency response of the processing device. Digital audio processing has a perfectly linear frequency response after AD conversion. Nonlinear distortion consists of harmonic distortion, intermodulation distortion or both. Digital processing is perfectly linear except for minute intermodulation distortion as explained above.

    Effects produce deliberate and well controlled deviations from (distortion to) the original audio.

    You said:

    It also likely depends on what kind of music you are making and what your source material is (starting from single tracked instruments vs a recording of a live ensemble).”

    I do not see any reason why shortcomings of the audio processing would improve on the composer’s intentions or the musician’s performance.

    For the above, we need to stay digital unless we have a good reason to go analog.

    I am looking forward to your help in ridding this space of false claims originating from unscrupulous salesman but also ridding this space of unfounded myths, circulating unbounded.


    Best wishes,

    Herbert

    GPO, JABB, CMB, GWI, GOFRILLER, HALION PLAYER, ACCORDIONS by E Tarilonte
    Cubase 6, Notation Composer, VSTHost, GoldWave audio editor.

    Interests:
    Good Food, Gemütlichkeit, Wein Weib und Gesang – History, Politics, Civil Law –
    Electronics, Software Development, Physics – Plant Physiology, Creative Horticulture –
    Photography, Painting, Wood Working - Midi Orchestration, Music, Music, und Musik …

  6. #6

    Re: Loading Aria player (& recording)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Gardner View Post
    I just got GPO4 with the Aria player which I want to use with Finale 2011.
    I can load the Aria player outside of Finale with 16 instruments and save the Aria settings for these instruments.
    How do I get to the next 16 instruments?
    I can load all Aria banks within Finale, but the instruments are only saved for that particular music file.
    I want to set up the Aria player the same for all my music - without reloading all the instruments for each new Finale file.
    Can anyone help?

    Also - how do I record my music?
    All this was straightforward with my GPO Studio version 1.2

    Hey Jeff,

    You could use the setup wizard which will load all the necessary instances of aria you need. If you want to do it manually you can do that as well. The point is you can use Aria within Finale and that would probably be the simplest setup.

    Steve Winkler

  7. #7

    Re: Loading Aria player (& recording)

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Gardner View Post
    I just got GPO4 with the Aria player which I want to use with Finale 2011.
    I can load the Aria player outside of Finale with 16 instruments and save the Aria settings for these instruments.
    How do I get to the next 16 instruments?
    I can load all Aria banks within Finale, but the instruments are only saved for that particular music file.
    I want to set up the Aria player the same for all my music - without reloading all the instruments for each new Finale file.
    Can anyone help?

    Also - how do I record my music?
    All this was straightforward with my GPO Studio version 1.2
    As Steve says, you can use Aria directly within Finale. No need for using Aria externally then trying to connect with Finale.

    You want to setup the Aria Player the same for all your music? Couldn't be easier. Just use Finale's Setup Wizard to setup your score as you want it. Your score is setup with all necessary instances of Aria, all instruments are assigned to staves and everything is set all ready for playback. Then just save this as a template.

    As for recording your music, this too can be done directly within Finale. Just go to File-Export to Audio File. Simple as that.

    Further detailed information on using Finale's Setup Wizard, Templates and Recording your music in Finale can be found in the Finale Manual and Tutorials.
    Michael
    Patience is a virtue, sensitivity is a gift

  8. #8

    Re: Loading Aria player (& recording)

    Hi, Jeff - I'm glad you're getting such expert help, especially from people proficient in using Aria with Finale. A key point is to set things up like Michael just talked about, and which Steve brought up earlier. You definitely want to keep your Finale recordings in the digital realm, as was thoroughly gone over on this thread.

    I wish you the best in your continued efforts.

    Randy

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