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Topic: Writing orchestal music and music recommendations.

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  1. #1

    Writing orchestal music and music recommendations.

    So Ive used strings synths before and have written a lot of music using basic string elements in reason. But now that I have GPO 4 I really want to get into more technical aspect of orchestral music and how its composed and what instruments go with each other and dynamics and so on. If some one could recommend me perhaps were there is a tutorial were I can learn these things and also I want to start listening to a lot of orchestral music because I learn a lot from just listening to something and trying to recreate it so if someone could recommend me some music I could listen to thatd be great. I really enjoy sad pieces mostly that are really sad in beautiful way if anyone knows any to be specific but please recommend anything. Thanks again.

  2. #2

    Re: Writing orchestal music and music recommendations.

    nvm this online course on here for the principles of orchestration looks great, I wasnt sure were to find it but I did on the garritan site and I think ill just use this. Please still recommend music though if ud like or any other help.

  3. #3

    Re: Writing orchestal music and music recommendations.

    Hi, Donnynoir - I think you mean you found the Garritan Interactive PRINCIPLES OF ORCHESTRATION by Rimsky-Korsakov through the Forum jump menu. You can't really beat that as an educational resource. There's more material there than I could ever master - Try it out!

    Randy

  4. #4

    Re: Writing orchestal music and music recommendations.

    In addition to the Rimsky-Korsakov let me recommend:

    The Professional Composer/Arranger by Russell Garcia (2 volumes) (short and to the point)

    Treatise on Instrumentation by Richard Strauss and Hector Berlioz (hilarious, true and accurate!)

    Sounds and Scores by Henry Mancini

    Orchestration by Walter Piston (a prig when it comes to some things, valuable info otherwise)

    The Technique of Orchestration by Kent Kennan (my "go-to" reference)

    MIDI Orchestration by Paul Gilreath (expensive but worth it for me)

    Twentieth Century Harmony by Vincent Persichetti

    There are many more and I hope other members will chime in (Michel?). I know I am omitting a few and some I have recommended are not hard-core music school texts, but they have done the job for me.

    These are mainly orchestration texts. If you are looking for composing texts...hmmm...a little more rare. I could recommend:

    The Poetics of Music by Igor Stravinsky (I re-read this yearly) highly recommended!
    Form: the Silent Language by Hugo Norden (hard to find - try it through inter-library loan)

    Best of luck and happy reading.
    In theory there is no difference between theory and practice, but in practice there is.

    http://reberclark.blogspot.com http://reberclark.bandcamp.com http://www.youtube.com/reberclark

  5. #5
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    Re: Writing orchestal music and music recommendations.

    One of my favorite resource book is Samuel Adler - The Study of Orchestration.

    Dover Publications puts out quite a few scores at reasonable prices: http://www.doverpublications.com

    Jim

  6. #6

    Re: Writing orchestal music and music recommendations.

    Quote Originally Posted by donnynoir View Post
    So Ive used strings synths before and have written a lot of music using basic string elements in reason. But now that I have GPO 4 I really want to get into more technical aspect of orchestral music and how its composed and what instruments go with each other and dynamics and so on. If some one could recommend me perhaps were there is a tutorial were I can learn these things and also I want to start listening to a lot of orchestral music because I learn a lot from just listening to something and trying to recreate it so if someone could recommend me some music I could listen to thatd be great. I really enjoy sad pieces mostly that are really sad in beautiful way if anyone knows any to be specific but please recommend anything. Thanks again.
    I am a Garritan Professor of orchestration and have been teaching orchestration to selected pupils for five years - free (because I am retired and enjoy it). You will find a number of my orchestration tutorials on the Garritan website if you dig deep enough.

    I normally require pupils to have Sibelius as a means of exchanging scores with me by email, but if you have another score-writing program we might find a way round this.

    If you wish to go ahead please email me at td@quorndon.com

    Terry Dwyer

  7. #7
    Senior Member Tom_Davis's Avatar
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    Re: Writing orchestal music and music recommendations.

    I also recommend The Technique of Orchestration by Kent Wheeler Kenman published by Prentice-Hall, Douglas Moore editor.

    Barber's Adagio for Strings is an excellent piece for technique and the dramatic (some feel sad) sound og sturm und Drang (storm and stress).

  8. #8

    Re: Writing orchestal music and music recommendations.

    How about Alan Belkin's online books? ( http://www.musique.umontreal.ca/pers...n/e.index.html )

    You will maybe be most interested in the ones on musical form and on orchestration. Note, however, that Belkin covers general basic principles rather than "musical grammar" and properties of specific instruments. I find his work very useful, precisely because the subject matter covered supplements the content of other books very well.

    Oh - and Adler would be my choice for a basic rather technical orchestration text.

    Han
    Han Suelmann,
    Vista32, GPO4, COMB2, Finale 2009, Reaper, Intel Core 2 Duo, 4GB, 2.67 GHz.

  9. #9

    Re: Writing orchestal music and music recommendations.

    Quote Originally Posted by hansuelmann View Post
    How about Alan Belkin's online books? ( http://www.musique.umontreal.ca/pers...n/e.index.html )

    You will maybe be most interested in the ones on musical form and on orchestration. Note, however, that Belkin covers general basic principles rather than "musical grammar" and properties of specific instruments. I find his work very useful, precisely because the subject matter covered supplements the content of other books very well.

    Oh - and Adler would be my choice for a basic rather technical orchestration text.

    Han
    That's right! I figured Michel (qccowboy) would chime in about Bellkin. I believe he is a big advocate, but yes, Belkin is worth looking at!

    Also, if one can find it, Howard Hanson's Harmonic Materials of Modern Music is a fine study.
    In theory there is no difference between theory and practice, but in practice there is.

    http://reberclark.blogspot.com http://reberclark.bandcamp.com http://www.youtube.com/reberclark

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