• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 3 of 3

Topic: Monitors & the Sound Cards they are connected to...

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    Monitors & the Sound Cards they are connected to...

    So, I am looking at buying a good sound card and an introductory set of monitors. Good sound cards have a signal-to-noise ratio of anywhere from 108-124 : 1, however monitors tend to have a much lower SNR. For example, the ASUS Essence STX card has a SNR of 124, but the M-Audio AV30s (and even the better AV40s) have a SNR of >90.

    Should I be trying to match SNRs of both the sound card and monitors?

  2. #2

    Re: Monitors & the Sound Cards they are connected to...

    The higher the SNR ratio, the better. You pretty much can't go wrong with any audio interface/monitor combo as long as the SNRs are that high. (They'll all be pretty much within the ranges you posted.)

    What you have to worry about the most is what's going to dirty the signal, like interference such as ground loops and anything electrical that might be near the audio interface.

    Iacobus

  3. #3
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Just north of Sydney
    Posts
    272

    Re: Monitors & the Sound Cards they are connected to...

    G’day FossMaNo1,

    You said:

    So, I am looking at buying a good sound card and an introductory set of monitors.”

    My recommendation would be that you put all your money into the best monitors you can afford to buy. If you do orchestral music you also should buy a subwoofer, matching your monitors.

    You said:

    Should I be trying to match SNRs of both the sound card and monitors?”

    No need to do that. Two devices of equal SNRs will result in 3dB reduction of the SNR of a single device.

    Our hearing range is about 130dB. You are not likely to enjoy such a range in a home studio. You have all this noises you normally do not take notice of, like street noise, noise from your bar fridge, noise from the computer’s cooling fans. Those noises can be reduced. Another noise you have to watch for is the humming noise, power transformers of large amplifiers produce. I am talking here about the hum that emanates directly from the power transformer, rather than through your speakers. I have just exchanged an active speaker, having that problem. This is a relatively frequent problem. When you buy a power amp or active speakers, turn the volume down and listen to the equipment close up in a quiet room.

    Iacobus is right when he says:

    “What you have to worry about the most is what's going to dirty the signal …”

    If you get active monitors, this is what I would recommend; the audio should be connected via balanced cables. Audio interfaces often have balanced OUTs. Direct injection boxes can also be used to balance your audio connections. Eliminating ground loops and other noise sources can be quite a problem, at times.


    Best wishes,

    Herbert

    GPO, JABB, CMB, GWI, GOFRILLER, HALION PLAYER, ACCORDIONS by E Tarilonte
    Cubase 6, Notation Composer, VSTHost, GoldWave audio editor.

    Interests:
    Good Food, Gemütlichkeit, Wein Weib und Gesang – History, Politics, Civil Law –
    Electronics, Software Development, Physics – Plant Physiology, Creative Horticulture –
    Photography, Painting, Wood Working - Midi Orchestration, Music, Music, und Musik …

Go Back to forum

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •