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Topic: Richard Wagner key?

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  1. #1

    Richard Wagner key?

    Is there any prefered key this great composer used?


    The infamous "Tristran Chord" is 0+6+4+5 (F,B,D#,G# aug6)


    thats a bit of a strange scale if converted so.


    Could anyone recommend me some tips to get instant "Wagner" sound?
    Or is the trick really just dobling everything in multiple octaves and fortissimo chords over 4 octaves ,at least? And using absolutely no tonal reference, but just 12-tone thorough?
    I still like to know a tonal-key to start with


    Die Walküre (The Ride of the Valkyries) is B minor

  2. #2

    Re: Richard Wagner key?

    Tristan Chord = Fmi7b5 or Abmi6

    Wagner has more than a few tonal sections in his body of work, but is well known for a harmonic style leading away from any fixed key.

    Basically, to "sound" like Wagner:

    • Harmony in thirds including 7ths & 9ths
    • Lots of suspensions & pedals
    • Lots of chromatic/stepwise motion among the supporting voices
    • Routinely keep the bass off the root of the harmony until cadence
    • Progress by moving one or two voices at a time to the next chord
    • Double most lines in unison/octaves using at least one member of each of the three main groups - wind, brass, & string
    • Wear only silk shirts

    Hope this helps!

  3. #3

    Re: Richard Wagner key?

    Quote Originally Posted by DarwinKopp View Post
    Tristan Chord = Fmi7b5 or Abmi6

    Wagner has more than a few tonal sections in his body of work, but is well known for a harmonic style leading away from any fixed key.

    Basically, to "sound" like Wagner:

    • Harmony in thirds including 7ths & 9ths
    • Lots of suspensions & pedals
    • Lots of chromatic/stepwise motion among the supporting voices
    • Routinely keep the bass off the root of the harmony until cadence
    • Progress by moving one or two voices at a time to the next chord
    • Double most lines in unison/octaves using at least one member of each of the three main groups - wind, brass, & string
    • Wear only silk shirts

    Hope this helps!
    +1 for silk shirt wearing! Quite Wagnerian.
    In theory there is no difference between theory and practice, but in practice there is.

    http://reberclark.blogspot.com http://reberclark.bandcamp.com http://www.youtube.com/reberclark

  4. #4

    Re: Richard Wagner key?

    Quote Originally Posted by DarwinKopp View Post
    ...silk shirtsHope this helps!

    Thanks for those kind suggestions, I think thats a great bunch of

    You seem to agree with the 12-tone/chromatic scale fact? Wagner was truly the master of chromatic madness.

    inspiration. Maybe we should open a forum with each classical composer cliche trademarks?



    So anyone can read this list, go ahead and make some music in the manner of their favourite composer!

  5. #5

    Re: Richard Wagner key?

    This is going back into the recesses of my memory, but wasn't he influenced by Carlo Gesualdo?
    Steve Winkler GPO4 JAAB3 Finale 2012 Reaper Windows 7 Pro 64-bit VSL SE+

  6. #6

    Re: Richard Wagner key?

    Quote Originally Posted by swinkler View Post
    This is going back into the recesses of my memory, but wasn't he influenced by Carlo Gesualdo?
    Very probably - Gesualdo had a very similar technique of using tonal progressions, whilst having a complete disregard for longer-term tonality.

    If we're starting a page of composers' trademarks, I'll kick us off with Ludovico Einaudi:-

    • Take a chord - preferably with an added 2nd
    • Now play it in a variety of 'broken chord' figurations, with the right hand in 6/8 and the left in 3/4
    • Repeat for an hour
    David

  7. #7

    Re: Richard Wagner key?

    That Gesualdo individuo has quite the Wiki bio. I'm surprised HBO hasn't made a mini-series out of it.

  8. #8

    Re: Richard Wagner key?

    Quote Originally Posted by Pingu View Post
    Very probably - Gesualdo had a very similar technique of using tonal progressions, whilst having a complete disregard for longer-term tonality.

    If we're starting a page of composers' trademarks, I'll kick us off with Ludovico Einaudi:-

    • Take a chord - preferably with an added 2nd
    • Now play it in a variety of 'broken chord' figurations, with the right hand in 6/8 and the left in 3/4
    • Repeat for an hour

    I don't know that artist, but this made me smile.



    How about Bach cliches:
    *Play Harpsichord
    *Left hand plays a 2/4 or 4/4 'general bass' figure played as chords to your liking
    *Right hand plays a 8th notes figure with at least one ornament per measure, add occasional trillers with speeds up to 128ths. Play as much ornaments as possible
    *Build up a cadence for the last 1/3, until ending with a perfect cadence
    *Everything is played continuously for 2-3 minutes, Bach is a matter of performance sport.
    *Add one occasional musical "breakdown" for when your wrist starts to hurt. Play a lower bass figure, hold notes for one bar and arpeggiate a counter-directional melody with the right hand. Alternatively simply rest 1 bar
    *Follow the Preludium with a Fugue!

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