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Topic: Using Guitar Pro 6 with GPO4

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  1. #1

    Using Guitar Pro 6 with GPO4

    I just bought GPO4 so that I can make some better sounding concepts for school. What I do basically is write ambient music for video games. I use Guitar Pro which is basically a midi editor that can play back with more realistic sounds. What I want to do is import midi files that I made in Guitar Pro and further edit them (assign instruments, etc) in ARIA.

    The reason I'm so attached to Guitar pro is because I can compose in standard notation and guitar tab at the same time. Quite wonderful, actually, and I really HATE the composition tools in programs like reason and fl studio with that piano roll nonsense.

    I'm TOTALLY new to GPO4 so be descriptive.

  2. #2

    Re: Using Guitar Pro 6 with GPO4

    Quote Originally Posted by gutzsy View Post
    I just bought GPO4 so that I can make some better sounding concepts for school. What I do basically is write ambient music for video games. I use Guitar Pro which is basically a midi editor that can play back with more realistic sounds. What I want to do is import midi files that I made in Guitar Pro and further edit them (assign instruments, etc) in ARIA.

    The reason I'm so attached to Guitar pro is because I can compose in standard notation and guitar tab at the same time. Quite wonderful, actually, and I really HATE the composition tools in programs like reason and fl studio with that piano roll nonsense.

    I'm TOTALLY new to GPO4 so be descriptive.
    Hi, Gutzy

    It's an unusual approach you're trying out, but it could work - you'll just be limited in what you'll be able to do.

    Guitar Pro still can't use VST plug-ins. If it could, then you'd be able to open Aria in GP and have GPO available right there where you're comfortable working.

    I'm sure you understand that more full featured MIDI programs like Sonar give you a lot more options than what you have with GP which is primarily for working with guitar and other string instruments.

    --side note - The Piano Roll View in these programs does take getting used to when one is notation-oriented. But it's a very worthwhile to learn, because the PRV is the most powerful tool available for MIDI editing. That's where all MIDI controllers are available for editing - every parameter possible can be easily accessed through a PRV.

    The stand-alone version of Aria can import MIDI files. But you can't do any editing of the MIDI files since Aria is a sampler player, intended mostly to be used as a VST plug-in in sequencing programs. You'll be able to assign instruments to the various MIDI channels in your MIDI file, and set panning, volumes - the basic mixing chores can be done - Maybe that's all you're wanting to do.

    In the bottom left hand corner of the Aria stand-alone version, click the arrow pointing upwards. That's the browser you can use to locate and import a MIDI file. The first button, the arrow pointing towards the right, is the play button.

    So, import the MIDI file, choose your instruments - play, use the mixer.

    Be aware that Aria automatically assigns instrument slots 1 through 16 to MIDI channels 1 through 16. Those assignments can be changed if you want by clicking the MIDI channel numbers at the far right of the gray information window under each instruments name.

    Randy

  3. #3

    Re: Using Guitar Pro 6 with GPO4

    Thanks for the advice. It all could have worked so well if not for a fundamental problem.

    When I export then import my midi to GPO, a lot of the effects I wrote in GP6 don't carry over (legato, accentuation, etc). Otherwise this would have been a perfect method. It seems I will need to learn a program that can integrate with ARIA.

    Thank you for the info, It's my first day using the program and I already feel like I've learned a lot.


    I'm sure you understand that more full featured MIDI programs like Sonar give you a lot more options than what you have with GP which is primarily for working with guitar and other string instruments.
    Actually, you can do quite a lot with GP nowadays. I write drums lines, flutes, and piano parts with guitar pro and it actually sounds pretty decent in the internal playback.

  4. #4

    Re: Using Guitar Pro 6 with GPO4

    Quote Originally Posted by gutzsy View Post
    Thanks for the advice. It all could have worked so well if not for a fundamental problem.

    When I export then import my midi to GPO, a lot of the effects I wrote in GP6 don't carry over (legato, accentuation, etc). Otherwise this would have been a perfect method. It seems I will need to learn a program that can integrate with ARIA.

    Thank you for the info, It's my first day using the program and I already feel like I've learned a lot.
    Ah, yes, I see. There's always an issue when using MIDI files edited for one set of instruments and then playing the file with a different set. Different Libraries, synths, all react uniquely to MIDI data. One program will react more strongly to velocity, to Expression control etc.

    Biggest thing in this scenario is that GPO has several non-standard things in its programming. The biggest difference between GPO and standard MIDI instruments is that CC1 is used for volume, whereas it's usually used for Modulation (vibrato). The other major thing you need to understand is that GPO doesn't use Sustain, CC64, in the usual way. The PDF manual explains how a nice Legato is achieved using CC64 - but it's not the Sustain you're accustomed to.

    Yes, you'll need to get a more general purpose MIDI program, like Sonar, Reaper, Cubase - They can all use VST instruments like Aria, and full editing is available.

    Good questions - sorry importing MIDI into Aria is not quite what you were hoping the case would be.

    Randy

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