• Register
  • Help
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 29

Topic: How do you record and mix ?

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1

    How do you record and mix ?

    I've been getting the music down so that all the tracks play together nicely and then record each track to a wav file and then mix these. Does anybody else do it this way, should I record and mix straight from the aria player ?

    Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.
    Derek
    Things may come and things may go but the art school dance goes on forever
    NOW WITH Cubase 5, JABB,GPO, Fender Strat, Ibanez RG, Yamaha Fretless Bass, Framus Archtop, The Trumpet and Mr T Sax, together with GREEN SEALING WAX


  2. #2

    Re: How do you record and mix ?

    This is just the way I do it -

    I mix everything live in the DAW and only bounce to wav small segments in order to free up ram if needed.

    I find it's better to mix live midi data as you can constantly change and update and tweak.

    I eventually export the final mix to a wav file for 'mastering' - and then that's it.
    Website:
    www.grahamplowman.com
    YouTube Music:
    My Channel
    Twitter:
    @GPComposer
    Facebook:
    Facebook

  3. #3

    Re: How do you record and mix ?

    Plowking does it much like I do. I layout the tracks using ARIA (multi) and have each midi track going to an audio track for ARIA. I have enough RAM and speed (12 gigs of RAM and 3. (something) in CPU MHz) to do everything without the need to bounce to .wav tracks. I can then use fx on all the audio tracks streaming from the ARIA engine and tweak as tweak need be. When I am finished I mix it all to a stereo .wav file and save it that way.
    [Music is the Rhythm, Harmony and Breath of Life]
    "Music is music, and a note's a note" - Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong

    Rich

  4. #4

    Re: How do you record and mix ?

    If the project is 100% Garritan instruments, I mix it all as MIDI within Aria (or Sonar controlling Aria). Once I'm happy with the mix, I bounce it all down to a single stereo WAV file.

    If I am using the Garritan instruments as just a piece of a bigger project, and other things are going to be mixed with it, like guitars, vocals, other synths, etc., I start with getting a basic mix with all of the instruments in Aria, but when it comes time to bounce them to WAV, I split them up into stems, like "strings", "brass", "keyboards", "woodwinds", "percussion", etc. I may also leave them dry, and then apply reverb to the WAV files instead.

    Jim

  5. #5

    Re: How do you record and mix ?

    Quote Originally Posted by buckshead View Post
    I've been getting the music down so that all the tracks play together nicely and then record each track to a wav file and then mix these. Does anybody else do it this way, should I record and mix straight from the aria player ?

    Any thoughts on this would be appreciated.
    Good topic, Derek -

    I seem to work the way you do. I work up my arrangement, do everything I can in the MIDI realm, then bounce those individual instruments down to their own tracks. That's a very quick all-in-one step in Sonar, bouncing as many tracks as needed, from 2 to 100.

    Then I turn off the synths, mute and archive the MIDI tracks, hide them from view, and the rest of the project is all in the audio realm. I basically just love and wouldn't want to lose that matrix of working on a mix like studios have done for decades, only it's on a computer. I like seeing and working with Audio - there's a solidity about it that gives me confidence as I work.

    But doing it that way goes way beyond the aesthetic of just enjoying the virtual version of a classic recording studio. Quite some years ago I really took to heart what somebody with a lot more experience than I had at the time said about working with MIDI. He was showing how people who keep their projects only in the MIDI realm are missing out on much they can do if they'd record those tracks first to Audio. I followed his advice, and it still makes total sense to me.

    Some people do an amount of audio work in the otherwise blank looking audio tracks connected to a soft synth. But they can't see anything - I don't get that. With tracks bounced to audio, I can see exactly what I'm dealing with.

    For me, I can do a ton of working on balancing things with MIDI, but it's flat and never as dynamic and nuanced as I can get from working with the audio files. Here's a screenshot I have on hand of typical volume envelope work in my projects:

    All those little hills and valleys were done to make that particular track work better in the full mix, and it's more detailed than I'm able to achieve with MIDI.

    So, should you mix and record straight from Aria?---I would say don't do it - It's a lot more work to do it as we do, but from my experience, you maintain much more control over your music if you always bounce to audio first!

    Now - to see what others have said. Everybody works differently--it'll be interesting!

    Randy

  6. #6
    Senior Member Styxx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    West Seneca, NY
    Posts
    11,075

    Re: How do you record and mix ?

    I use a large bowl and a spatula.
    Styxx

  7. #7
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Shelton, Washington State
    Posts
    3,022

    Re: How do you record and mix ?

    I can't imagine not working with audio tracks. That's where you can really polish things up. I think it just as important if not more important than the MIDI side. That's where it gets fun and challenging for me.



    Phil

  8. #8

    Re: How do you record and mix ?

    I'm on the same page with you and Randy. After everything is "finished" (As if that word ever applies) I bounce the midi files to wav files and then spend the rest of my time in the audio plane. I've mixed down various sections before but then I feel like I'm simply stacking tracks as opposed to mixing them. If it's a piece consisting of GPO entirely I don't see where it's as necessary. The biggest reason for me to mix the tracks down separately is for the sake of EQing the tracks to fit together. If the entire project is GPO then I don't see much of a need. If I'm implementing guitars, drums and vocals than I may have to pan and EQ the instruments such that they do not walk over each other.

    Something I've found though is that when it comes to the super fine details, we music buffs are the only ones who notice much of a difference.

  9. #9

    Re: How do you record and mix ?

    Weel I've tried both and it seems that one is as good as another. It depends who you ask, so that's cleared up. Do both as the mood and the music take you.
    Derek
    Things may come and things may go but the art school dance goes on forever
    NOW WITH Cubase 5, JABB,GPO, Fender Strat, Ibanez RG, Yamaha Fretless Bass, Framus Archtop, The Trumpet and Mr T Sax, together with GREEN SEALING WAX


  10. #10

    Re: How do you record and mix ?

    Quote Originally Posted by buckshead View Post
    Weel I've tried both and it seems that one is as good as another. It depends who you ask, so that's cleared up. Do both as the mood and the music take you.
    As with most anything you can talk about under the general topic of recording music, there are countless variations in the way people approach the work, indeed.

    And since everyone develops personal methods that work best for them, it means that their methods are truly "the best way"--for them, for whatever the particular reasons are. Sometimes, then, when discussing things like this, people can lose sight of how what they find "best" is really just what's best for them, and may involve techniques that don't fit someone else's personality and preferences. We might encourage other people to test out our methods to see how it suits them, but we can never tell someone "this is the way you Should do this or that thing." Beware of people bearing absolutes!

    So, I can say without equivocation that working only with MIDI, mixing in MIDI, and only going to audio for the final 2-track master - that doesn't work nearly as well for me as bouncing individual tracks to audio and then doing the mix with those audio tracks. My work is much more polished and dynamic that way than if I stick with only what I can do with MIDI, even though I'm very good at working with MIDI.

    But that doesn't mean it's universally true for everyone that this is The Best Way to work. I can only speak for myself that one method is definitely not as good as the other. I don't change this basic way of working on a per-project basis, because the one thing that holds true for me always is that I'm going to get my best results when working with audio. Other aspects of the project will vary greatly, depending on the music - but not this basic mixing approach.

    Randy

Go Back to forum

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •