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Topic: Ambience in Aria

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  1. #1

    Ambience in Aria

    So, I would like to set most of my ambience instances to something reminiscent of a movie CD soundtrack where a full orchestra is recorded. Does anyone know of settings for Aria that would simulate this environment?

    Also, I really like that you can set difference ambiences in each instance of the Aria player (yes, I just upgraded to GPO4 from the original GPO, and so far I loveit!) and I remember a discussion a while back that talked about setting different reverb for each section of the orchestra, depending on distance from the "audience." I'm no sound engineer, so I was wondering if in Hollywood orchestral recording studio different reverbs were recorded for the various instrument sections, or is the same reverb recorded for all?

  2. #2

    Re: Ambience in Aria

    Quote Originally Posted by FossMaNo1 View Post
    So, I would like to set most of my ambience instances to something reminiscent of a movie CD soundtrack where a full orchestra is recorded. Does anyone know of settings for Aria that would simulate this environment?

    Also, I really like that you can set difference ambiences in each instance of the Aria player (yes, I just upgraded to GPO4 from the original GPO, and so far I loveit!) and I remember a discussion a while back that talked about setting different reverb for each section of the orchestra, depending on distance from the "audience." I'm no sound engineer, so I was wondering if in Hollywood orchestral recording studio different reverbs were recorded for the various instrument sections, or is the same reverb recorded for all?
    Hiya, Foss

    Any reverb plug-in, including Ambience, has large venue settings which will get you to the sound you're talking about. Ambience defaults to Ballroom 1 - click the menu on the Effects tab of Aria and try Concert 1 and/or 2. Those are large - Then the main ingredient after the room size is how much reverb you add to each instrument.

    I do want to note that you're talking about the current taste in movie soundtracks which is HUGE - as if everything is performed at the bottom of the Grand Canyon. Watch films of any age, certainly from the 70's down through the 40's, and you'll hear a much different and more natural sound. On those soundtracks, they had their orchestras sitting in the medium sized studio stages, and you can hear that--a nice, tight smallish reverb. --Notice I miss the sound of those soundtracks - they were so much more natural, clear, and dramatic. BUT, I know what you're talking about--the HUUUUUUUUUUUUUUGE, cavernous sound that's been popular for some time (too long)--- Get this-- when recording live orchestras for soundtrack work now, the engineers actually add artificial reverb to it to make it even more spacious than in the nice halls they record in. It's "The Hollywood Sound"---- but if that sound fad doesn't fade out within the next 10 years, I'll turn in my ASCAP card.---Well, knowing how fashions revolve in cycles, I KNow this current obsession with way too much reverb will go away and be laughed at. Somebody will re-discover the more intimate sound of the great soundtracks and think it's something new. 8-)

    But my main point really is that you just need to start with a large room, and then add a fair amount to each track.

    As for using a different reverb for different instruments or sections - I totally got sucked into that when I was first learning to record music on a computer. I used a different reverb for each section - spent hours agonizing over it, trying to follow all that I was reading online about it---And it sounded OK--BUT I know now that is basically BS. Like "Monster Cables" are going to make your sound better--same can be said for this trick of using different reverbs for different sections.

    No, all you need to do is use one reverb for a project, but then use logic in how much of that reverb you're adding to each section. Percussion in the back gets the most reverb, strings up in front get the least--that's the starting point if you're using a real-world model for how you set the reverbs.

    However, -- much too much is also made of how far away things are. THe concept is correct, that the farther away something is, the more natural reverb we hear mixed with sound--that's what happens in real life. But on a concert hall, we're not talking about huge differences in space---HOw far away the percussion is compared to the piano, or concert master, or harp--it's not that many feet. The difference of how much reverb the audience hears on the the farthest instruments (percussion) and the closest is extremely subtle. SO, I'm saying that's something else that is made too much of - I dutifully give my percussion the most reverb, the harp the least--and it's a subtle difference that matters--but the difference between the two settings isn't that all that great.

    That's why people who put their entire mix through one reverb setting really aren't that bad off--they can make that sound just fine.---Only most of them use too much reverb--they make it sound like the listener is in the very back row of an empty auditorium--that's a mistake. Most people over-use reverb.

    Back to the question about the current faddish Hollywood sound--yes, they put a lot more reverb on the percussion, that's why it sounds so gigantic - And you can emulate that simply by sending more signals to the reverb bus.

    ---This is assuming you're using a sequencer--like you just got Reaper. You can mix in notation too--much more fiddley though. In DAW software, you just set up a reverb on a bus--then set up Sends on each track, and dial in different amounts of signal to the reverb.

    ANother note--even though the Basses are farther away than the woods, for instance, it doesn't sound good to give them a lot of reverb--nothing muddies up a mix faster than adding too much reverb to bass frequencies. That's a perfect example of trying to emulate a real life concert that doesn't work so well in the virtual version---put less reverb on the basses than would seem logical.

    Use your ears---sounds muddy?--then dial it back.

    AND SO on---aren't you glad you asked? hehehe.

    Randy

  3. #3

    Re: Ambience in Aria

    Whew... now that's a lot to chew through! LOL Thanks again!

  4. #4

    Re: Ambience in Aria

    Quote Originally Posted by FossMaNo1 View Post
    Whew... now that's a lot to chew through! LOL Thanks again!
    --hehe, yes, well I got carried away.

    The short answer to your original question about using Aria to achieve that big movie soundtrack sound is in the first paragraph of that novel I wrote earlier. Just open the Concert Halls in Aria and start trying out different amounts of Send. You'll get a nice big, impressive sound.

    Best wishes for your endeavors.

    Randy

  5. #5

    Re: Ambience in Aria

    This is really weird, I get stuck on something, post a query and immediately find that someone has posted a similar query hours earlier. Not quite my question but close.
    Derek
    Things may come and things may go but the art school dance goes on forever
    NOW WITH Cubase 5, JABB,GPO, Fender Strat, Ibanez RG, Yamaha Fretless Bass, Framus Archtop, The Trumpet and Mr T Sax, together with GREEN SEALING WAX


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