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Topic: Blast Off with Instant Orchestra - a How To video tutorial part one

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  1. #1

    Exclamation Blast Off with Instant Orchestra - a How To video tutorial part one

    PART TWO can be found HERE!


    Inspired by posts here asking for a complete "how to" tutorial, here is the first chapter of "Blast Off with Instant Orchestra."

    Starting at square one, and with the neophyte in mind, an action/adventure music cue is created using Garritan Instant Orchestra.

    Part One: "Setup" - Installing Aria and Instant Orchestra, setting up a project file, seeing how Aria and IO interact with recording software.

    Coming next - The Instant Orchestra Control Panel.

    The only things assumed:

    --The viewer either has Instant Orchestra, or is contemplating getting it.

    --Has recording software he/she knows how to use.

    --Knows that a "VST" is a plug-in used for creating digital audio, and can be either a software instrument, or a software audio processor.

    --That to install Aria and IO, one just clicks the installer and pays attention to the various windows that come up during installation.

    The tutorial series is aimed at users of "sequencer" software, otherwise referred to as "DAW" (digital audio workstation) software. Sonar 8.5 is used in the video, but it's made clear that the same principals apply to all brands of recording software.

    How the information presented applies to notation software is only implied. The focus is on using IO in a conventional audio/MIDI recording program.

    Each cliff-hanging chapter of the tutorial is approximately 4 minutes long. At that length, even though a lot of information is covered, the viewer won't be overwhelmed by too much information at a time.

    By the end of this short series of tutorials, all newcomers will be able to create music with Instant Orchestra they can be proud of!

    Click the rocket ship to blast off to the full, widescreen video - AND be sure to have the quality settings (gears at lower bottom right) set to 1080 for high resoluton playback. You'll be able to read every word on the screen and follow along easily.


    (click the picture for the video)
    "BLAST OFF WITH INSTANT ORCHESTRA!"

    Randy

  2. #2

    Re: Blast Off with Instant Orchestra - a How To video tutorial part one

    Hi Randy,

    Thanks for the excellent tutorial of setting up ARIA and Instant Orchestra inside of SONAR. Looking forward to the next chapter.

    Cheers!
    Chad

  3. #3

    Re: Blast Off with Instant Orchestra - a How To video tutorial part one

    Excellent. I use Reaper myself, but, as you say, the principles are all the same. Thank you so much for taking the time to do this!
    Best,
    Tom Smith
    www.tomsmithonline.com

  4. #4

    Re: Blast Off with Instant Orchestra - a How To video tutorial part one

    Chad, and Tom "filkertom"--Glad you both like the first installment.

    Serials/Cliffhangers/Chapterplays are one of my not-so-guilty pleasures, hehe, so it was fun to frame this series in the style of "Flash Gordon," "Captain Marvel," "The Masked Marvel"-et al.

    This first chapter is extremely basic, but answering the request you made on a previous thread, Tom, I wanted to be sure that I really started from square one and then advanced on through to how to come up with an impressive project using IO.

    Sonar's my reference point, but I know, as you said, Tom, that everything I point out has an analogous function in any other recording program. If anyone watches and thinks it only relates to Sonar, then they're just not using their head enough.

    Hopefully this will become part of the official IO promotion at the main Garritan site, so new users have access to an easy reference guide on getting up to speed in an Instant!

    Randy

  5. #5

    Re: Blast Off with Instant Orchestra - a How To video tutorial part one

    Sitting on my hands and holding my breath for the next chapter Randy!
    BTW, you probably know this but you could have a career doing VO...very pleasant, friendly voice you have there bud.
    Thanks,
    GRB

  6. #6

    Re: Blast Off with Instant Orchestra - a How To video tutorial part one

    I guess I should explain "filkertom". My name is Tom, and I'm a filker -- that is, I'm part of the community of musicians who attend science fiction and fantasy conventions and make our music there.

    "Filk", as a noun/genre, got its start back in the days when blogs were called fanzines, and were mimeographed with that blue-inked, crank-driven drum press some of the older folks might remember. In one fanzine, someone was commenting on a few fans who, after official programming for the day had ended, were hanging out with a couple of guitars and singing folk tunes, some of which had changes to the lyrics to reflect sf/f genre themes (e.g., "Out in the starlanes near Alpha Centauri, I fell in love with an alien girl...").

    Thing is, he misspelled "folk" as "filk". When she saw this, Karen Anderson (wife of author Poul Anderson) said yeah, that's what we're doing.

    "Filk" is also a noun/verb, meaning either "parody" or "to parody", i.e., the above lyric example is a filk of "Streets of Laredo". Weird Al Yankovic says he's not a filker, but his song "Yoda" is about as pure an example of filk as there is. ("The Saga Begins" is, unfortunately, about as pure an example of bad filk as there is -- he just retells the story of the movie, adds only one joke... sigh.)

    Lastly, "filk" is the community itself. We find each other at conventions, play new songs for each other, encourage each other, make sure everyone has a chance to perform. Because of this last part, filk has something of a not-so-good reputation at conventions -- in an open filk room, we let everyone get the chance to sing, even the most shy, tone-deaf, or rhythm-challenged. Unfortunately, sometimes that particular person will be the one singing just as people go by the room on the way to a party, and so they think that all filk must be like that. We try to correct this in the most straightforward way possible -- we get concert slots at conventions and blow people away.

    We also have pros who are filkers -- and when I say pros, I mean Janis Ian comes to WorldCon filks. A number of performers, such as Joe Bethancourt, Heather Dale, Dave Clement, and S. J. Tucker attend conventions regularly, and while Jonathan Coulton does not do so, he thinks filk is pretty cool. (He's a great guy -- I've met him a few times now, and we both performed at Dragon*Con in Atlanta last year.)

    Anyway. I've been filking for over 25 years, and I've achieved some notoriety. I've been using the handle "filkertom" online for about ten years now, and so that's me.

    Sorry for going on so long, and thanks for reading.
    Best,
    Tom Smith
    www.tomsmithonline.com

  7. #7

    Re: Blast Off with Instant Orchestra - a How To video tutorial part one

    Fantastic, Tom!--- I bet I'm not alone when I say I've never heard of this whole "Filk" sub-culture. That is so cool!

    - I do indeed remember mimeographed fanzines - a good friend of mine produced one for some time, way back in that other era. But the rest of it--I did not know. THANKS for explaining - Now I want to go to a Sci-Fi convention again--When I lived in the LA area, I went to the big ComicCon a number of times, but am not sure there were filking events there.

    Love it - Thanks for the great post!

    ---and--stay tuned for more "Blast Off"--coming soon to a Forum near you!

    Randy

  8. #8

    Re: Blast Off with Instant Orchestra - a How To video tutorial part one

    Quote Originally Posted by GRB53 View Post
    Sitting on my hands and holding my breath for the next chapter Randy!
    BTW, you probably know this but you could have a career doing VO...very pleasant, friendly voice you have there bud.
    Thanks,
    GRB
    hehe--Glad you enjoyed, and thanks for the compliment "GRB"--I see you're chosen a new signature--it has distinction.

    By the time this series concludes, anyone with a recording program will be able to produce some nifty music with IO - Stand by!

    Randy

  9. #9

    Re: Blast Off with Instant Orchestra - a How To video tutorial part one

    I see you're chosen a new signature--it has distinction.

    Well yeah, it was getting a little confusing and you certainly have seniority here so I figured the change was in order.

    By the time this series concludes, anyone with a recording program will be able to produce some nifty music with IO - Stand by!

    I love nifty music!


  10. #10

    Re: Blast Off with Instant Orchestra - a How To video tutorial part one

    Quote Originally Posted by rbowser- View Post
    Fantastic, Tom!--- I bet I'm not alone when I say I've never heard of this whole "Filk" sub-culture. That is so cool!

    - I do indeed remember mimeographed fanzines - a good friend of mine produced one for some time, way back in that other era. But the rest of it--I did not know. THANKS for explaining - Now I want to go to a Sci-Fi convention again--When I lived in the LA area, I went to the big ComicCon a number of times, but am not sure there were filking events there.

    Love it - Thanks for the great post!

    ---and--stay tuned for more "Blast Off"--coming soon to a Forum near you!

    Randy
    Thank you, Randy! It's funny, because filk isn't a huge thing as such (although there are conventions on both coasts, the midwest, Canada, and Germany devoted specifically to it -- they're like big ol' family holidays, only with your chosen family and lots more guitars), but we end up providing a lot of entertainment to many conventions.

    Comic-Con (San Diego, I presume you're talking about) isn't likely to have much filk. While there have been some musical performances there, they tend to be more... amplified, yeah, that's the word. And the primary point of a con like that is to sell stuff, and to preview upcoming stuff. With the exception of Dragon*Con, which is a similar monster though better balanced towards having a little bit of everything, I tend to hit local and regional cons with between 500 and 2,000 people, and that's what I'd recommend if you want to get back into the con scene, if only because it won't be as loud and overwhelming. (I can only survive Dragon by renting a mobility cart; the programming is spread over five hotels, with about a dozen secondary hotels.)

    On the other hand, there are a few very good cons up in Oregon and Washington -- http://www.orycon.org/ in Portland in November has a strong music presence, and http://conflikt.org/ in Seattle is an all-music con in just a few weeks, with some good friends of mine as the guests.

    And there are lots of cons up and down the California coast, both general cons and genre-specific (e.g., anime, Harry Potter, gaming, etc). Not too many between California and Illinois, though -- CopperCon in Phoenix, FenCon (quite a lot of fun) in Dallas-Fort Worth, Archon in St. Louis, MiniCon and MarsCon in Minneapolis, several more -- but once you get into Chicago and further east, business picks up again.

    And, to show that it's hardly just us old fat guys with guitars, here's a clip from Dragon*Con a few years ago. Basically, several people had been hanging out at the musicians' tables, and they started goofing and improv'ing together on their various violins and fiddles, they drew a crowd, and ended up getting concert space.

    http://youtu.be/dSZSC2GEL1c
    Best,
    Tom Smith
    www.tomsmithonline.com

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