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Topic: Two Skeletons Copulating on a Tin Roof

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  1. #1

    Two Skeletons Copulating on a Tin Roof


    Two Skeletons Copulating on a Tin Roof
    Skeleton I. Organized Chaos
    Skeleton II. Baroque: When You Have No Monét
    composed by Rodney Money

    British maestro Thomas Beecham once so poetically said concerning the sound of the harpsichord, “The harpsichord sounds like two skeletons copulating on a tin roof in a thunder storm.” So basically that quote was the inspiration for joining my harpsichord pieces “Organized Chaos” and “Baroque: When You Have No Monét” into a single work. Instead of calling each section movements, I thought I would attempt to be witty and call them skeletons. So “Organized Chaos” is the first skeleton or movement and “Baroque: When You Have No Monét” is the second.

    Some of you have already heard the first skeleton “Organized Chaos” which uses a modern compositional technique in which every measure modulates to a different key. So each measure acts as a pivot chord to the next. I first wrote the chord progression then melodic lines connecting them with passing tones. What started as a compositional exercise turned into an actual composition surprisingly enough which ends in a deceiving diminished 7thchord. Feel free to give it another listen for this version has a lttle more reverb for a concert effect.

    Second skeleton “Baroque: When You Have No Monét”is a marriage between the old: Baroque counterpoint, ornamentation, and German Augmented 6th chords with the new modern compositional techniques based off diminished 7th chords. So in the words of Charles Ives’s daddy, “It’s time to stretch the ears a bit.”

    I have provided the folder for the entire work which contains sound and score files. I find for me that it is always fun to watch the score while you hear the music. https://www.box.com/s/44fda6f114319dda7bff

    ~Rodney

  2. #2

    Re: Two Skeletons Copulating on a Tin Roof

    I kind of like these two pieces. But, as I wouldn't be satisfied, as a general rule, to just listen to a couple of movements from, say, Bach's French or English suites, so too with these skeletons. Perhaps you could flesh them out into a full suite of pieces? Then I'm sure I would enjoy them much more than I already do!

  3. #3
    Senior Member rwayland's Avatar
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    Re: Two Skeletons Copulating on a Tin Roof

    It seems to me that T.B. was more concerned with a clever phrase than with reality. Admittedly, there are some bad harpsichords, but I think his description would be better applied to quite a few cheaply built and poorly maintained spinet pianos, and to quite a few cheap sound cards.

    Richard

  4. #4

    Re: Two Skeletons Copulating on a Tin Roof

    Eye catching title - Funny quote it's from. And you know, I think Beecham had something there in his description of the Harpsichord's sound. It's an instrument I have difficulty listening to for very long at all, especially in solo. It's so relentless with its strident clanging, all at the same volume- my ears soon say - "ENOUGH already!"

    So, you can see I had an issue even before I clicked "Play" - sorry about that.

    And, well, I really don't have anything to say, Rodney. I wrote the intro about the Harpsichord mainly so I could write Something. I'm just can't get engaged with this music. It perplexes me. I think of these as being of the academic, experimental sorts of things that have always left me wondering what the point was.

    But my personal taste has nothing to do with what you've written. I'm just unable to say anything about your pieces, other than I don't understand them.

    I did want you to know that I listened, like I did on the "Organized Chaos" thread where I preferred the version that added a violin. I'm always curious to see what fellow Forum members are up to. So, thanks for letting us take a listen, Rodney.

    Randy

  5. #5

    Re: Two Skeletons Copulating on a Tin Roof

    Quote Originally Posted by rwayland View Post
    It seems to me that T.B. was more concerned with a clever phrase than with reality. Admittedly, there are some bad harpsichords, but I think his description would be better applied to quite a few cheaply built and poorly maintained spinet pianos, and to quite a few cheap sound cards.

    Richard
    Hi Richard, thank you for stopping by and giving a listen. I think you are correct concerning T.B. I've even heard he had a few sayings for the music of Beethoven and Bach also. Teaching clients I have heard my share of poorly maintained spinet pianos also, but maybe he was also thinking about the sound of a xylophone?

  6. #6

    Re: Two Skeletons Copulating on a Tin Roof

    Quote Originally Posted by Mabry View Post
    I kind of like these two pieces. But, as I wouldn't be satisfied, as a general rule, to just listen to a couple of movements from, say, Bach's French or English suites, so too with these skeletons. Perhaps you could flesh them out into a full suite of pieces? Then I'm sure I would enjoy them much more than I already do!
    I take that as a compliment, my friend. Thank you so much. I have debated on "fleshing" them out with an addition of an aira and a fugue, but sadly I see the future of my harpsichord composing coming to an end. It was more like putting a puzzle together than painting a picture. Though, playing many Bach suites in my life I know exactly where you are coming from and we might still get some skin on those bones.
    ~Rodney

  7. #7

    Re: Two Skeletons Copulating on a Tin Roof

    Quote Originally Posted by rbowser- View Post
    Eye catching title - Funny quote it's from. And you know, I think Beecham had something there in his description of the Harpsichord's sound. It's an instrument I have difficulty listening to for very long at all, especially in solo. It's so relentless with its strident clanging, all at the same volume- my ears soon say - "ENOUGH already!"

    So, you can see I had an issue even before I clicked "Play" - sorry about that.

    And, well, I really don't have anything to say, Rodney. I wrote the intro about the Harpsichord mainly so I could write Something. I'm just can't get engaged with this music. It perplexes me. I think of these as being of the academic, experimental sorts of things that have always left me wondering what the point was.

    But my personal taste has nothing to do with what you've written. I'm just unable to say anything about your pieces, other than I don't understand them.

    I did want you to know that I listened, like I did on the "Organized Chaos" thread where I preferred the version that added a violin. I'm always curious to see what fellow Forum members are up to. So, thanks for letting us take a listen, Rodney.

    Randy
    Randy, it always means a lot to me when you stop by and take a listen even though you know that the relentless, unchanging harpsichord is going to sound when you click play. Innovative thinkers such as yourself helped music evolve to a more emotional art form, and I thank you for that, and also, that may be the reason why the piano came into fashion and the sound of the harpsichord simply faded away depicting the past. Thank you once again for taken the time to listen and write something.

    I guess if there was a point to modern techniques it would be the discovery of new sounds from the norm of scales. For me, it gives the composer new tools to build upon and new inspiration to compose works stretching personal boundaries that otherwise would never be possible using traditional methods.

    Randy, I want to try something out on you my friend, and everyone else. Please if you have the time, take a listen to "Dance of the Golden Calf" which is from my suite "Sins of the Old Testament." "Dance of the Golden Calf" is the finale to the suite and is scored for violin, clarinet, bassoon, tuba, congas, and cowbell. Just simply listen to the melodic contour, harmonies, and the overall feel and groove. I would like to hear your comments concerning the work and then I will tell you later how I composed it. https://www.box.com/s/0abdd09a2769fdc3bfb7
    ~Rodney

  8. #8
    Senior Member Frank D's Avatar
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    Re: Two Skeletons Copulating on a Tin Roof

    Hi Rodney,

    Have listened to both of these a few times this week ... I always like to listen to music outside my comfort level. In this case, even the orchestration is outside my zone with solo harpsichord (I would argue xylophone is far more colorful! LOL). I do like the harpsichord timbre, but not in long, exposed forays. But then it's only fair for me to admit that I don't listen to a lot of music from the period when harpsichord ruled! Nonetheless, thanks for sharing these pieces (10 for the titles!)

    I did enjoy S-II ... if it's possible to say the harpsichord can "cook", then @ 0:36 your piece seriously gets into a great groove ... pretty cool for a period piece like this.

    As far as S-I, I had left you a question regarding the compositional device used for "Org Chaos" ... it's still there in that thread (now on page 2) and since this is the same deal (and piece!), If you get a minute, I would still like to know what you feel about it. Thanks!

    Frank

  9. #9

    Re: Two Skeletons Copulating on a Tin Roof

    Hey Frank! Sorry I missed that question. Did not mean to, my friend. I will take a look at it right now.
    ~Rodney

  10. #10

    Re: Two Skeletons Copulating on a Tin Roof

    Quote Originally Posted by composingatnight View Post
    Hey Frank! Sorry I missed that question. Did not mean to, my friend. I will take a look at it right now.
    ~Rodney
    There are actually several replies there not responded to, Rodney. I thought maybe you were abandoning your post for some reason.

    Randy

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