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Topic: Help Needed With Studio Headphones

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  1. #1

    Help Needed With Studio Headphones

    I'm due to replace my headphones which were the Beyer Dynamic DT150 and I feel that I do need to 'move on' for something better. I use my 'phones almost exclusively as part of my composing and mixing and listening to CDs at my computer. I am looking for phones that 'tell me as it is' and without colour or emphaising this or that frequency but with as much detail as possible without having to win the lottery..

    I am currently looking at the Sennheiser HD25-1-II BE on offer for £140 ($222) and the Beyer Dynamic DT770 Pro also on offer at £127 ($201)

    At present I'm leaning towards the Sennheiser HD25 as I have heard and read that the Beyer Dynamic DT770 are a little 'bass heavy'.

    Does anyone have either of these or can offer advice or suggestions for other phones to look at..

    Many thanks.
    Michael
    Patience is a virtue, sensitivity is a gift

  2. #2
    Senior Member Silh's Avatar
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    Re: Help Needed With Studio Headphones

    I have a pair of the 250ohm DT770's, had them for about 4 years now, and I really like them. I have read some comments/complaints about differences in the frequency response between the different impedance DT770's (looks like 32ohm, 80ohm, 250ohm which I think is the 'DT770 Pro', and 600ohm), so (as with any audio equipment) it's always a good idea to audition them first of course. They seem very mildly bass heavy to me, but not anywhere near what I have heard out of some other headphones, and some of the treble is a tad exaggerated as well, but I've pretty much gotten used to it's quirks by now for mixing. I also find them very comfortable, so have no problem wearing them for hours, and the sound isolation from them is pretty decent.

    The other phones I fall back on are a pair of Senn HD280's of about 10 years, which were my main phones before I got the DT770's. They seem a bit lacking in the detail that the DT770's have, and maybe also a tad boomy with the bass/mids as well, but they feel a bit... unforgiving... so I use them to look for quirks in the mix which I might not catch with the DT770's or my crappy speakers. They're not my favourite cans to listen to music on most of the time. Their sound isolation is superb (have missed the phone on my desk ringing a few times wearing them and with the music at just a moderate level), and I find them even more comfortable than the DT770's. The construction is on the flimsier side; mine has electrical tape wound around the top of the headband to reinforce/repair it after cracking it (which resulted from having some heavy books placed on top of it while it was on my desk... so with proper care they should be fine).

    Both of these are closed phones though; I have no open ones due to the desire for sound isolation, so I can't make any recommendations on those, though the consensus tends to be that open ones give more accurate reproduction.

    (All the above is IMHO, of course, since audio is so subjective...)

    Hm, quick search of the HD25-1 II's seems to show that they are of the on-top-of-the-ear type rather than over-the-ear, which might be an issue as well.
    -- Matt Wong

  3. #3

    Re: Help Needed With Studio Headphones

    Maybe a little over your budget, but I find the Sennheiser HD 600 phones to be great.
    I wasn't as taken with the newer HD 650 set when I auditioned them some months back.
    Maybe they hadn't been burnt in?

    And that's the thing with the HD 600s. They do need some hours of burning in before they settle down.

    It's an open back headphone which, to my ear, gives a very open, natural sound, but they're not sound isolating.

    The ear pads surround the ear, I can't abide the on-ear type, and are extremely comfortable to wear for protracted periods. The bonus is that most of the components are replaceable (at a cost). I've just replaced all the pads on my old set where the foam was showing signs of age and use.

    I've just noticed that I've got them on as I write.

    Kind regards,
    John.

  4. #4

    Re: Help Needed With Studio Headphones

    I have the 80-ohm version of the DT770 and mine also say "Pro."

    I am quite pleased with them and would recommend them.

    I'm not quite sure what the different ohm values mean in terms of
    response, though.

    Anyone who mixes using phones might want to look at the
    Focusrite VRM Box. It is designed to allow headphones to emulate
    characteristics of popular reference monitor speakers.

    Jim
    Jim Williams
    Professor of Capitalism
    N9EJR
    Indianapolis Brass Choir
    All Your Bass Sus&Short Are Belong to Us.

  5. #5

    Re: Help Needed With Studio Headphones

    Quote Originally Posted by snorlax View Post
    Anyone who mixes using phones might want to look at the
    Focusrite VRM Box
    Hi Jim,
    do you own it?
    What about?
    I'm going to widen my production weaponry and I'm interested into it -- if it's worth to have.
    Fabio
    Arrigo Beyle / Milanese / Lived, wrote, loved -- Stendhal
    Being Italian is a full-time job -- B. Severgnini

  6. #6

    Re: Help Needed With Studio Headphones

    Quote Originally Posted by fabiolcati View Post
    Hi Jim,
    do you own it?
    What about?
    I'm going to widen my production weaponry and I'm interested into it -- if it's worth to have.
    Fabio,
    I am very pleased with my VRM Box. Sometimes I simply must work using headphones. Headphones tend to create more separation when listening to music, especially closed-ear headphones, so they are not the best means to mix music.

    The VRM Box (VRM=Virtual Reference Monitor) fixes this situation and allows headphones to emulate several popular reference monitors. That makes mixing with headphones a more rewarding process.

    Having said that, I still don't take the time I need to do a better mix. Maybe when I retire. Day job plus performance schedule do not allow for much free time, and I generally don't want to spend most of my free time mixing!!

    You can learn more and see some reviews by googling or looking at the Focusrite website.


    Jim
    Jim Williams
    Professor of Capitalism
    N9EJR
    Indianapolis Brass Choir
    All Your Bass Sus&Short Are Belong to Us.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Silh's Avatar
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    Re: Help Needed With Studio Headphones

    Quote Originally Posted by snorlax View Post
    I have the 80-ohm version of the DT770 and mine also say "Pro."

    I am quite pleased with them and would recommend them.

    I'm not quite sure what the different ohm values mean in terms of
    response, though.
    I'm not familiar with how headphone/electronics design can affect the sound, so I can't speak much about that. However, something which may be interesting:

    http://www.headphone.com/learning-ce...are+Headphones

    Note the dip in the low end for the 600ohm DT770's. I remember reading an offhand comment that the 600ohm ones were the least bass-heavy and most accurate at that end, and the 32ohm ones were the worst... granted this was someone's opinion on it...

    (Take frequency response graphs and their flatness with a grain of salt... there's always the factor of how your ears hear different frequencies too... hence, as always, listen to it before you buy!)
    -- Matt Wong

  8. #8

    Re: Help Needed With Studio Headphones

    Thanks everyone for all your help and suggestions. It's very much appreciated.

    Matt, thanks for pointing out that the HD25-1 II's are on the ear rather than over. I had missed this point with these. I really would prefer the circumaural.so it's back to the drawing board.

    Now I'm looking at the KRKs KNS 8400 at £129 ($205), the Shure SRH840 on offer at £139 ($221) or even the Shure SRH940, their top of the range which I have spotted on offer at £160 ($254).

    The KRKs are interesting as I have their VXT8s studio monitors and their 'phones are designed to compliment their monitors closely. Although I'm not so keen on the headband which both looks and has been claimed by some to be uncomfortable.

    At the moment I am drawn to the Shure phones. Their SRH840 were their flagship phones until the launch of their SRH940s and have a big price reduction. Now their latest top 'phone is available at bargain prices. Add to this that they have had superb reviews by both professionals and non pros alike.

    Thanks again for all your valued input.
    Michael
    Patience is a virtue, sensitivity is a gift

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