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Topic: Is it mono a need sometimes? adding space to the mix?

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  1. #1

    Is it mono a need sometimes? adding space to the mix?

    This question might have been made before but if it has, I can´t find it.

    I just read a post telling how far instruments don´t usually require stereo. My question is: Will mono versions allow me for more space into the mix?
    If the answer is \"no\", wha´ts the usal way to do add that air? I sometimes feel like my mix is so full of instruments I can´t find the correct space for each one...

  2. #2
    andyt
    Guest

    Re: Is it mono a need sometimes? adding space to the mix?

    Yeah, I was wondering about over the last couple of days ... jus by coincidence.

    Do stero samples make panning or placement more difficult ?

    Is better to work in mono, and use a stero reverb to introduce a feeling of space during the last stages ?

  3. #3

    Re: Is it mono a need sometimes? adding space to the mix?

    I think the close mic\'d libraries like Dan Dean Woodwinds work better in mono in an orchestral context. Because they are close mic\'d, the stereo width is unaturally wide and too artificial for them to work as part of an orchestra. At the very least the stereo width should be significantly narrowed and then panned into the appropriate place.

    A library like SAM horns recorded with the instrument in place would be best left in glorious stereo.

  4. #4

    Re: Is it mono a need sometimes? adding space to the mix?

    Well you can think about it this way: suppose Dan\'s woodwinds are recorded from 2-3 meter, with the mics quite close together. This gives some limited stereo information. Now if you want to tweak this recording to make it sound like it\'s recorded from some 10-12 meters, you\'d have to collapse the stereo image anyway, making it even more mono-ish. From that distance, a flute or oboe is just a single point source. Now you need to add (or fake) early reflections that are appropriate for the room you want to emulate. You could use SoundStage, a reverb\'s ER settings or some impulse. If you don\'t change the original stereo information (from that close-up recording), you are effectively breaking the illusion of a bigger room by mixing incorrect stereo images.
    Mono instruments are also 50% of the stereo versions, so you can load twice the amount of Gigs.
    Of course this approach only applies to relatively dry and closely recorded solo instruments. I have read of people doing this with string sections, but that really sounds terrible. Here you should make the image smaller to put the entire section further away.

    (edit: Marsdy and I posted at the same time, essentially identical replies [img]images/icons/wink.gif[/img] )

  5. #5
    andyt
    Guest

    Re: Is it mono a need sometimes? adding space to the mix?

    Thanks Peter and Marsdy.

    But how do you reduce a stereo image width ? Its obvious how to go mono, but how do you reduce width ?

  6. #6

    Re: Is it mono a need sometimes? adding space to the mix?

    Yeah, thanks both for the input.

    As for stereo width, I would use SoundForge´s Pan/Expander if I had nothing else, or Waves S1 or Soundstage given the chance.

  7. #7

    Re: Is it mono a need sometimes? adding space to the mix?

    I say the answer to the question depends on the context. You certainly want orchestral instruments to be strereo, since it\'s a blend you\'re after.

    But in pop mixes, a friend of mine (who mixed half the albums in the \'80s and is still going strong) puts it this way: \"If everything\'s stereo then nothing is stereo.\"

    Again, this depends on what you\'re after. Some pop mixes also go for a blend rather than clarity. The two don\'t have to be mutually exclusive - Roland Orzabal\'s (Tears for Fears) albums come to mind - but for example stereo close-miked bass drum isn\'t likely to be a good thing.

  8. #8

    Re: Is it mono a need sometimes? adding space to the mix?

    If you simply use a single balance control you effectively reduce the level of one of the channels, thus throwing away part of the original stereo information. Think of \"real\" stereo balancing as panning the L and R channels independently. This way you keep more of the original sound. For instance, to move a stereo sound to the left, you pan L all the way to the left and R to the center.
    I believe you can do this in GigaStudio\'s DSP section, although I prefer to use Waves S1 on my audio inputs in Logic.

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