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Topic: Posting mockups of others' compositions?

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  1. #1

    Posting mockups of others\' compositions?

    Hate to add to the stack of \"is this legal\" posts, but I\'m not sure how this works.

    I\'ve started a small project geared towards student composers that don\'t have access to great libraries and equipment, where I basically take the scores they\'ve written and mock them up for a studently priced fee, bringing in inexpensive solo players where needed from my university. It still amazes me to find just how many young composers in college don\'t know about gigastudio or sampling in general. When they do learn of it, the overwhelming price of setting it up from scratch, and the time it takes to learn to do it well, tends to diminish their spirits about it all somewhat. I\'ll have them work with me on their scores, and while I\'m the one doing it all, they can watch and advise as the creator of the music, and hopefully learn a bit about how it all works. (also becomes great experience for me, expanding my own abilities as people ask for stuff I wouldn\'t normally do.)

    To this end, I\'m of course posting and creating demos of my own work to demonstrate what samples can accomplish, and just what they can expect out of the libraries I have at my disposal. The problem is there is no reference for them to compare to an actual orchestra in these cases.

    We\'ve posted all kinds of excerpts and demos of other composers\' works on this forum over the years, and I was wondering about the legalities of this. I decided to mockup Princess Leia\'s Theme (one of my fav\'s of JW\'s) and something most would be familiar with. I\'m not finished yet, mostly because of the end of the semester, but it occurred to me that I was planning on completley mocking up a piece of music that I didn\'t write, and then posting it online for people to listen to. Even if I give full credit to the man that wrote it, isnt\' that a bit like posting an mp3 of his work that people wouldn\'t have to buy?

    Between the soloists and small ensemble of trumpets I\'m recording, and the really fantastic samples that will be used, it\'s already sounding pretty incredible, and when finished I think it\'ll be indistinguishable from the real thing unless you directly compare the two... Which of course is the whole point, and I hope will attract the business of even the most skeptical students.

    The question is, \"is this legal?\" Can I post someone else\'s composition even with full credit given to the composer? It\'s not that I\'m worried about being sued or anything (I know my place in the world, and this isn\'t even a small blip on the screen) but I\'d like to be on the up and up. Any thoughts?

    Thanks,
    mike

  2. #2
    Senior Member Bruce A. Richardson's Avatar
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    Re: Posting mockups of others\' compositions?

    Originally posted by MichaelAngelo450:
    Hate to add to the stack of \"is this legal\" posts, but I\'m not sure how this works.

    I\'ve started a small project geared towards student composers that don\'t have access to great libraries and equipment, where I basically take the scores they\'ve written and mock them up for a studently priced fee, bringing in inexpensive solo players where needed from my university. It still amazes me to find just how many young composers in college don\'t know about gigastudio or sampling in general. When they do learn of it, the overwhelming price of setting it up from scratch, and the time it takes to learn to do it well, tends to diminish their spirits about it all somewhat. I\'ll have them work with me on their scores, and while I\'m the one doing it all, they can watch and advise as the creator of the music, and hopefully learn a bit about how it all works. (also becomes great experience for me, expanding my own abilities as people ask for stuff I wouldn\'t normally do.)

    To this end, I\'m of course posting and creating demos of my own work to demonstrate what samples can accomplish, and just what they can expect out of the libraries I have at my disposal. The problem is there is no reference for them to compare to an actual orchestra in these cases.

    We\'ve posted all kinds of excerpts and demos of other composers\' works on this forum over the years, and I was wondering about the legalities of this. I decided to mockup Princess Leia\'s Theme (one of my fav\'s of JW\'s) and something most would be familiar with. I\'m not finished yet, mostly because of the end of the semester, but it occurred to me that I was planning on completley mocking up a piece of music that I didn\'t write, and then posting it online for people to listen to. Even if I give full credit to the man that wrote it, isnt\' that a bit like posting an mp3 of his work that people wouldn\'t have to buy?

    Between the soloists and small ensemble of trumpets I\'m recording, and the really fantastic samples that will be used, it\'s already sounding pretty incredible, and when finished I think it\'ll be indistinguishable from the real thing unless you directly compare the two... Which of course is the whole point, and I hope will attract the business of even the most skeptical students.

    The question is, \"is this legal?\" Can I post someone else\'s composition even with full credit given to the composer? It\'s not that I\'m worried about being sued or anything (I know my place in the world, and this isn\'t even a small blip on the screen) but I\'d like to be on the up and up. Any thoughts?

    Thanks,
    mike
    <font size=\"2\" face=\"Verdana, Arial\">NOT legal.

    You need to get permission from the publisher, and work out a royalty--that\'s the up and up way to approach it. Depending upon the publisher, you might get permission to use an excerpt for non-commercial purposes ABSOLUTELY FREE!!!!

    Generally, such a use is labeled \"Used by permission\" and contains the full publishing information for the pice in question.

    The important thing is to ask.

    Pieces in the public domain are less likely to land you in a lawsuit, but even at that, you\'ll find that publishers still own rights to particular arrangements, catalogued versions, etc. The very best thing to do is again, just look up the publisher\'s number, call, and ask. That way, you are on the 100% up and up, and everyone\'s rights are being respected.

  3. #3

    Re: Posting mockups of others\' compositions?

    Taking care of that right now, Bruce. Appreciate the advice!

    I thought about doing the public domain thing... but damn this music is so much fun, heheh. Again thanks, gunna go look up some numbers now.

    mike

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