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Topic: Third movement of new flute work - a jig

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  1. #1

    Third movement of new flute work - a jig

    This is Quoddy Jig, the concluding movement of Three Preludes. All done with the Flute Solo KS. I imported the MIDI file from Finale, then worked a lot in the sequencer to "micro-adjust" the conductor track, especially to account for how a flutist would take slight breaks for breath at the end of sections. Also, I spent a lot of time with note lengths and note velocities, or attacks. This was really important for realistic grace notes and to get the rise and fall of the phrases. I found the GPO4 flute sample to be quite flexible for getting something that approaches a realistic performance.

    Here's the link: https://www.box.com/s/xvrhwaf2pyeyz1uoqn8x

    The program notes:

    III. Quoddy Jig. The jig is a lively folk dance that appears to have developed in England in the 16th century; it is now most familiar in Celtic music. Traditional (or “roots”) music is quite popular in eastern Maine, where I live, so it seemed natural for me to compose a pretty straightforward jig. The word quoddy is adapted from the Native American Micmac word meaning “fertile or beautiful place,” and aptly describes the region.

    Thanks for listening.
    John Newell
    www.johnnewellmusic.com
    GPO4, Garritan World Instruments, Digital Performer 7.24, Finale 2012, Miroslav Philharmonik

  2. #2

    Re: Third movement of new flute work - a jig

    Again a big hand for that magnificent solo flute accomplishment. It requires a lot of skill and technical precision to realise this score. To make something personal of it demands lots of study. But it is a very high standard of present day flute repertoire. A must for every professional today.
    Congratulations for the 3 pieces!


    Max

  3. #3

    Re: Third movement of new flute work - a jig

    Quote Originally Posted by John Newell View Post
    ...I imported the MIDI file from Finale, then worked a lot in the sequencer to "micro-adjust" the conductor track, especially to account for how a flutist would take slight breaks for breath at the end of sections. Also, I spent a lot of time with note lengths and note velocities, or attacks. This was really important for realistic grace notes and to get the rise and fall of the phrases...
    Bravo, John - This sounds fantastic, and it's a sweet little Jig.

    I'm very impressed with what you're doing to massage the most life possible into the original Finale file. Working with adjusting note lengths is in itself one of the most important things for notation users to do if they launch into DAW software work. Once those endlessly redundant cookie cutter lengths are varied in an intelligent way, a lot has been done to make the results more natural.

    Great!

    Randy

  4. #4

    Re: Third movement of new flute work - a jig

    I don't have much experience with this instrument, but this sounds as if somebody is playing in front of me. What a nice piece and great performance!!!!

    Raymond

  5. #5

    Re: Third movement of new flute work - a jig

    Guys, Many thanks for your comments. Next project is a work for orchestra that I'm finishing up the orchestration for. Any thoughts about whether it makes more sense to create your own string sections rather than use the GPO built-in sections?

    John
    John Newell
    www.johnnewellmusic.com
    GPO4, Garritan World Instruments, Digital Performer 7.24, Finale 2012, Miroslav Philharmonik

  6. #6

    Re: Third movement of new flute work - a jig

    Randy, I clicked on "Dorian Gray" cast album download. You wrote the book, the music, performed it all with the singers? Wow. Amazing. An incredibly fine choice for a topic as well.

    John
    John Newell
    www.johnnewellmusic.com
    GPO4, Garritan World Instruments, Digital Performer 7.24, Finale 2012, Miroslav Philharmonik

  7. #7

    Re: Third movement of new flute work - a jig

    Hey, John - Taking the reference to "Dorian" first -
    Quote Originally Posted by John Newell View Post
    Randy, I clicked on "Dorian Gray" cast album download. You wrote the book, the music, performed it all with the singers? Wow. Amazing. An incredibly fine choice for a topic as well.
    John
    I'm so glad you investigated the link in my signature. "Dorian" is the biggest project of my life. What you heard at BandCamp was recorded live in performance - the premiere production of my show in 2008 done b y an amateur group in Oregon. Since that time, the show was picked up and now it's in a open-ended professional run in Moscow, Russia, where they're doing a uniquely Russian version of the show.

    When I first joined the Forum in 2007, "Dorian" was the first thing I shared with the Garritan group here - Then the productions followed. One of the biggest highlights for me in the "Dorian" history is that Gary and Marianne Garritan attended opening night. Unforgettable! -- Thanks for taking a look at the show - those were the very first tracks I ever produced with Garritan instruments.

    Now - to your question -

    Quote Originally Posted by John Newell View Post
    ...Any thoughts about whether it makes more sense to create your own string sections rather than use the GPO built-in sections?
    John
    I didn't stop to look for the thread just now, but earlier this year we ran a bit of a test here at the Forum on the concept of "ensemble building" that you're talking about. The basic conclusion we came to is that the theory doesn't really quite work out. The biggest problem of trying to build string sections from soloists is that those instruments are probably the weakest in GPO. Some of us did our best in assembling ensembles from scratch, but the results weren't very satisfactory.

    The standard approved method is to use the group string patches, and to layer in soloists for each section. You need to mix them so the soloists don't really stand out, but are adding a bit of flavor to the mix. Experiment with that. In many of the best demos you've heard of GPO, that's what the creators were doing. That's basically how I always approach using strings in GPO - and I often add the "full strings" patch, or the "lush" patches at a lower level to boost things up.

    Randy

  8. #8

    Re: Third movement of new flute work - a jig

    Randy, Thanks for the tips on string sections. I'll be experimenting with them year end... still completing the orchestration. and congratulations on your success with Dorian Gray. I really appreciate your generosity of time and thoughts on the forum!

    John
    John Newell
    www.johnnewellmusic.com
    GPO4, Garritan World Instruments, Digital Performer 7.24, Finale 2012, Miroslav Philharmonik

  9. #9

    Re: Third movement of new flute work - a jig

    Fun piece! I can imagine it backed with some renaissance era percussion.

    I'm curious, are you mostly leaning on the non-vibrato patches for short notes and key switching to vibrato for the extended ones?

  10. #10

    Re: Third movement of new flute work - a jig

    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Bendshadler View Post
    Fun piece! I can imagine it backed with some renaissance era percussion.

    I'm curious, are you mostly leaning on the non-vibrato patches for short notes and key switching to vibrato for the extended ones?
    Hi Daniel. I just used the GPO4 Flute Solo KS and didn't didn't use the non-vibrato keyswitch at all. I wasn't aware of any vibrato in the fast passages, but maybe my hearing isn't that good. Thanks for asking the question... I should go back and experiment.

    John
    John Newell
    www.johnnewellmusic.com
    GPO4, Garritan World Instruments, Digital Performer 7.24, Finale 2012, Miroslav Philharmonik

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