• Register
  • Help
Results 1 to 6 of 6

Topic: 1922 Kodak Color Film Test

Share/Bookmark
  1. #1
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Shelton, Washington State
    Posts
    3,022

    1922 Kodak Color Film Test

    This is an early test of color film. It would be another 13 years before a full length color feature film would be released.

    Nice soundtracks!

    The following text is from another online post:

    The first lady is Hope Hampton, a silent movie actress who was sometimes mockingly called "Hopeless Hampton" because she wasn't considered to be a very good actress though she was popular. She was thought to be the model behind Susan Kane's lack of talent in "Citizen Kane". She died in 1982. The next lady is Mary Eaton, a stage actress and Ziegfeld Follies girl. She died in 1948, The third lady is Mary Pickford wearing her costume from Little Lord Faulteroy. She died in 1979. The lady with the flower is Esther Ralston, who acted throughout her life until her death in 1994. The young boy who runs up to her is Jackie Coogan(uncle Fester). He died in 1984. At the time they were in "Oliver Twist" together. The movie is up on youtube in its full version. I can't figure out who the lady with the roses on her hat is but since the others were in movies that were hits at the time she must be, too. The lady at the end is ¿The Girl with the Bee-Stung Lips¿ Mae Murray, who died in 1965.



  2. #2

    Re: 1922 Kodak Color Film Test

    That's a really nice find, Phil! Beautiful looking early color, and all of the women are so wonderful to watch. And you're right that it has a nice soundtrack too - It'd be a fun project writing for something like that.

    And speaking of early color, did you see my Christmas video post in The Listening Room? The footage is from a 1903 !- French film about Jesus. It's an early example of hand tinting - gorgeous results they got.

    "We Three Kings" with hand tinted film

    Randy

    EDIT: I looked through that "3 Kings" thread again, and remember now that you Did see this, Phil. Oh well, maybe others will be curious.

  3. #3

    Re: 1922 Kodak Color Film Test

    Very cool find, Phil! The images were quite stunning. (The music was nice, too!)

    Ted
    Music and humor are healthy for the soul.

  4. #4

    Re: 1922 Kodak Color Film Test

    Wikipedia currently lists early color films, going back to 1903 -- though I can't vouch for its accuracy:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of..._feature_films

    They include some titles which only have color inserts.

    One of the earliest complete features I've seen is Eddie Cantor's "Making Whopee", which included the new element of sound. It used a 2-color process that was quickly abandoned in favor of Technicolor's 3-color process. The huge cameras used for the latter actually ran three rolls of black and white film through the gate(s), each filtered for a different primary color. If I remember correctly, the negatives were dyed and combined in the lab. That's what produced those fabulously staturated colors in "The Wizard of Oz" and "Gone with the Wind".

    Allegro Data Solutions

  5. #5

    Re: 1922 Kodak Color Film Test

    Quote Originally Posted by ejr View Post
    Wikipedia currently lists early color films, going back to 1903 -- though I can't vouch for its accuracy:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of..._feature_films

    They include some titles which only have color inserts.

    One of the earliest complete features I've seen is Eddie Cantor's "Making Whopee", which included the new element of sound. It used a 2-color process that was quickly abandoned in favor of Technicolor's 3-color process. The huge cameras used for the latter actually ran three rolls of black and white film through the gate(s), each filtered for a different primary color. If I remember correctly, the negatives were dyed and combined in the lab. That's what produced those fabulously staturated colors in "The Wizard of Oz" and "Gone with the Wind".
    Notice the first film listed in the Wiki entry is "La Vie et la passion de Jesus Christ," the 1903 French movie I used clips from in my "3 Kings" video. I'd read elsewhere that the color in that was hand tinted, but this entry says it used Pathecolor, a "stencil-based film tinting process" - which makes sense, and still sounds like it must've called for a lot of hands-on work. That film is so beautiful. Take a look at my video posting earlier in this thread if you haven't seen it.

    Randy

  6. #6
    Senior Member fastlane's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Shelton, Washington State
    Posts
    3,022

    Re: 1922 Kodak Color Film Test

    Randy,

    I thought I'd mention your We Three Kings video is 1080 HD on YouTube so I watched it again, this time in full screen. It looks to me like it could have been a combination of film tinting and hand coloring. It's hard to know without understanding how the two processes worked.


    PS
    Mary Pickford has a aura about her in this short footage.



    Phil

Go Back to forum

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •